Devon A. Mihesuah

Dance of the Returned

Forthcoming Fall 2022 from University of Arizona Press, Sun Tracks series.

The Hatak Witches

A baffling museum murder that appears to be the work of twisted human killers results in an unexpected and violent confrontation with powerful shapeshifters for Choctaw Detective Monique Blue Hawk (first introduced in the award-winning crime novel Document of Expectations). Blending tribal beliefs and myths into a modern context, The Hatak Witches continues the storyline of Choctaw cosmology and cultural survival that are prominent in Devon Mihesuah’s award-winning novel, The Roads of My Relations.

“As informative as it is gripping, this supernatural mystery from Mihesuah is rooted in Choctaw cosmology and contemporary Native American life. Set on Oklahoma’s Chalakwa Ranch, the story follows Det. Monique Blue Hawk as she investigates a break-in and the murder of a security guard at a nearby children’s museum. As Monique’s investigation pulls her deeper into the supernatural, Mihesuah expertly weaves in Choctaw legends and superstitions. The author’s ability to immerse the reader in the lives of her characters is prodigious, making the social realism of Monique’s life as fascinating as the supernatural elements. Readers looking for intelligent, diverse supernatural fiction will be captivated. “-Publishers Weekly

“If you are looking for a journey into modern-day Choctaw spirituality, The Hatak Witches is a trip waiting to be taken.”—Geary Hobson, author of The Last of Ofos

“A Native American woman detective is called to the local museum to investigate a murder. A man and his son out hunting come upon a gruesomely slain deer. Owner of the Chalakwa Ranch and his wife witness a dark entity on their land that causes all of the winged beings to flee in a panic. This mystery novel, set in contemporary Oklahoma, tells of tribal magic, dark powers, and forces that manipulate and collide into the present day, causing these characters’ lives to tumble into chaos and to reckon with the otherworldly and supernatural.”—Tiffany Midge, author of Bury My Heart at Chuck E. Cheese’s

“Devon Mihesuah’s The Hatak Witches, is a sharp, smart, supernatural thriller that you won’t be able to put down.”—Erika T. Wurth, author of Crazy Horse’s Girlfriend

Document of Expectations 

Oklahoma Writer’s Federation Trophy Award for Best Book of Fiction 

“A novel of great drama and high crime. With obvious anger and subtle plotting Document of Expectations manages to keep the reader on the edge of their seat with anticipation…. One is reminded of Ishmael Reed. The drama, politics, and culture all mingle to create a wonderful effect.”- David Treuer, Leech Lake Ojibwe, author of The Translation of Dr. Apelles

“In this carefully woven narrative, Mihesuah takes readers though an intricate maze of dysfunctional departmental politics and the lucrative world of stolen Indian artifacts. Along the way, she exposes a range of long-held stereotypical and colonial assumptions about indigenous people, and in particular about the aims and purposes of indigenous activist scholarship in American universities. This book is a compelling and highly entertaining mystery, but is also an important contribution to the literature of indigenous resistance.”- Michael D. Wilson, author of Writing Home: Indigenous Narratives of Resistance

When it comes to money, the competition within a school can be fierce, and maybe even turn bloody. “Document of Expectations” is an intriguing novel set in a dysfunctional school. When some unique American Indian artifacts are stolen, racism and stereotypical assumptions throughout an American university are exposed. Tackling many issues while proving a high entertaining read, “Document of Expectations” is an excellent pick for fiction and Native American studies collections. –Midwest Book Review

The Roads of My Relations

Oklahoma Writers’ Federation Trophy Award for Best Fiction Book of 2000 

The Roads of My Relations is a store of hearty, attentive stories of an extended family. Devon A. Mihesuah creates a mighty sense of time and place in the close relations of her characters, an actual native presence. The many roads over more than a century come alive in a generous mosaic of memories, philosophies, and cultures. The reader becomes part of this great native family.”–American Book Award winner Gerald Vizenor 

“A sprawling, yet intimate, portrait of one family’s place in [Native American] society and in the larger society in which we all live.” —Resound

“Throughout her vignettes, truth is carefully balanced with magical realism and remnants of Choctaw lore. For her first work of fiction, Mihesuah wields a deft pen. Full of powerful imagery, sometimes whimsical, often bleak . . . What is particularly refreshing about Mihesuah’s lushly detailed work is that it eschews both contemporary New Age renderings of Native American culture and nineteenth-century romanticism. . . . Mihesuah creates fascinating characters and robust histories.” —American Indian Quarterly

With the publication of Roads of My Relations, [Mihesuah] branches out to fiction, thereby extending the scope of her call for nation-based, tribally specific writing. Roads of My Relations . . . travels rewarding roads of family remembrance, with compelling meditations on losing home, making home, and returning home.” –SAIL

On reading The Roads of My Relations it became immediately apparent that I was reading more than a piece of fiction. The work is like a reflexive culture history of one Choctaw family as they labor to find peace in a rapidly changing world. As Mihesuah writes in her afterward, many of the stories evolved from family stories but are embellished to add interest. I would add to her admission, intricate, complex cultural nuances that lead the reader through a complex maze filled with humor, tragedy, and persistence. . . Every once in a while it is a delight to venture beyond the traditional disciplinary boundaries drawn by academia. By reading Roads of my Relations I had the opportunity to do so. It was a pleasurable journey. The story is an absorbing tale, mixing history, legend, and the author’s vivid imagination, accompanied by rich cultural insights. In her first collection of stories, Devon A. Mihesuah gives us a rich mosaic of interwoven lives.—American Indian Culture and Research Journal 

The Lightning Shrikes

“Like and unheralded rookie hurler who comes out of nowhere, reaches the big leagues and wins 20 games with a dazzling assortment of pitches and pinpoint control, The Lightning Shrikes is a surprising literary diamond in the rough.” Arizona Daily Sun

“The Lightning Shrikes Hits a literary Home run!” Ceilon Asperon

“Mihesuah, as usual, hits it out of the park, so to speak, with The Lightning Shrikes. This novel is remarkable in that it manages to be both a page turner, and a highly effective investigation of a plethora of issues germane to Indian country.” Jennifer Woodcock

“This easy to read page turner was one of the most enjoyable books I have read recently.” Heather Miller

Grand Canyon Rescue

Arizona Writer’s Association Best Non-Fiction Book  

Honorable Mention for Arizona Writers’ Association Best Book of the Year 

Finalist, Oklahoma Book Awards

Oklahoma Writers’ Federation Trophy Award for Young Adult Novel Award 

Big Bend Luck

One could consider Big Bend Luck as a field manual for desert hiking. Not only is it a cool setting, if you’ve hiked the Outer Mountain Loop, you’ll enjoy visualizing exactly where they are along the adventure.  It is full of keen advice for the young adventurist. –Big Bend Chat

Red Ink

“Medicine Woman,” in Red Ink 6 (Spring, 1998)

The Tamfuller Man,” Flagstaff Live! 3

“The Tamfuller Man,” Flagstaff Live! 3 (April 17-30, 1997). Winner of the 1997 Flagstaff Live! Short story contest. University of Arizona Press